Prefab housing needed to address homelessness

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Homelessness represents an ongoing challenge for our city and there is a shortage of long term affordable housing options and accommodation for people in need. With prefabricated (or modular) housing we could build more affordable housing for half the cost and in much less time than traditional housing construction.

If elected I will lobby Council to set targets for prefabricated housing to encourage this kind of development.

Quick facts about prefabricated housing: 

– For under $100,000 a two bedroom house can be manufactured and installed. For instance, in Perth a prefabricated house was recently delivered in just 14 weeks.

– Modern prefabricated housing looks like conventional housing and could be built to suit ‘the look and feel’ of Adelaide, complimenting the heritage values of existing properties.

– The high level of insulation means that this housing uses just 10% of the energy of a 5 star home so it’s much more affordable to heat and cool throughout the year.

– Prefabricated housing is made from sustainable materials (eg: local sustainable plantation timber) which means it has less of an environmental impact than conventional housing.

– In addition to helping people and our environment, increased investment in prefabricated housing could also create local jobs, stimulating our economy.

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4 thoughts on “Prefab housing needed to address homelessness

  1. I like the idea of this type of housing but after the homeless persons initial transitioning into housing is complete. I mean firstly acquiring support networks, physical and mental health, drug and alcohol dependency issues and living skills addressed . This is being done by Common Ground. I still think that ex-homeless people are better off living in supported accommodation with professional support people on hand at all times. From this accommodation people can then move onto independent living. I think your housing would be suitable for this stage.

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    • Hi Harey and Christine, Yes totally agree 🙂 The idea is not meant as an alternative to support networks, but rather it aims to help address the housing shortage aspect of homelessness. But the causes of homelessness are certainly complex and there are, as you say, a range of other services and supports that need to accompany that.

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    • Don’t get tricked into thinking that “supported accommodation” necessarily means anything positive for those living outside who, in many instances, leave welfare housing to escape Adelaide’s mentally crushing housing bureaucracies.

      To offer an even more intense experience in the form of “supported accommodation” serves few except the social workers who, apart from tormenting the residents further, suck out huge amounts of money that would be better used for building houses and flats.

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  2. Don’t get tricked into thinking that “supported accommodation” necessarily means anything positive for those living outside who, in many instances, leave welfare housing to escape Adelaide’s mentally crushing housing bureaucracies.

    To offer an even more intense experience in the form of “supported accommodation” serves few except the social workers who, apart from tormenting the residents further, suck out huge amounts of money that would be better used for building houses and flats.

    Norm Barber

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